A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME ~ Acteur by Azzaro

The heavy sumptuous red velvet curtain rose silently. The stage was as dark as 3:am. A lonely amber spotlight widened from a pinpoint at the center of the stage to reveal a lone handsome figure. The Actor.

   “To spray or not to spray, that is the question.”

The audience cupped in the neo classical splendor of the Comédie Française Theater was spellbound in shimmering silence.

“Whether ’tis nobler for the body to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous odors,
Or to take arms against a sea of stench,
And by opposing end them?”

   He raised a bottle of Acteur Azzaro to inspect it and then popped the top and sprayed it out over the assembly. Thunderous applause shook the rafters of the theater so violently as to cause a microscopic snow of plaster to lightly dust the audience.

The following morning the Parisian papers trumpeted the reviews, The Acteur is bombastic, over the top, and in the grand style of another age. Yet despite all of that, it is a fabulous exciting hit.

 

     And indeed it is. What a perfect name for this late 80’s power fragrance, Acteur, the Actor. It demands attention and carries a natural charisma that only a true star possesses.

 

The drama of its theatrical opening is huge! It is a tangy spiced cocktail of Fruit, nutmeg, bergamot and cardamom that nearly knocked me over. This opening quickly dissipates into a romantic masculine sublime mix of rose, jasmine, vetiver, cedar and patchouli that carries authority in that special 80’s way some of us love. In this entire olfactory splendor at center stage the Rose is the star of the production.  The dry down is a really scrumptious and sensuous concoction of leather amber musk and Oakmoss. I do have to say that throughout the entire performance of this fragrance the leather and amber move up into the middle notes which complement the rose.  They burnish the rose along with the jasmine in golden tones quite nicely.

The silage is fine, a range of about medium and it last a good 6 to 8 hours on my skin.

If you are looking back to the 1980’s for a fine mature fragrance with some authority and panache, Acteur should take center stage for you.

 

(Photograph of Actor Bryant Lanier by Joseph Moran)

FIVE GOLD STARS *****

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9 Comments

  1. I think my favorite picture here is the one of Jean Dujardin as the monk. He’s dreamy, isn’t he??? As always, love the fragrance review!

  2. Very sumptuous. I got the impression I was reading wrapped up in a velvet cloak 😉 My parents took me to the Comédie Française when I was a sprout and we had seats very near the stage because I remember watching, fascinated, as the actors declaimed in verse Moliere’s “Imaginary Invalid”. First of all it was in French (so impressive) and second there was a fine spray of vapor always suspended in the air kind of shimmering in the footlights every time Argan spoke. We must have been front row center.

    • I am pea green with envy! What a miraculous and thrilling memory. You can wear my magic velvet cloak anytime.

      • I think I was too young to appreciate what was going on, but I do remember the magnificent theater, and the pastry shops, and the gorgeous charcuterie, and the Louvre, and the Tuilleries… and the hotel we stayed on the Rue de Hyacinthe where there were always beautiful young Polish ladies arriving in the morning in black dresses and high heels and pearls while I was having my breakfast and I remember asking my Mom who they were and she told me, “I’ll tell you when you’re older.” Thanks for the velvet cloak and hugs from here, V

  3. How nice to return after a few days away and be seduced back into the blogosphere by reading another of your wonderful posts. Cheers from Chicago 🙂

  4. What a sumptuous concoction, not to mention a strong and most dramatic portrait of Bryant!

    • Yes he was so photogenic. That Is one of my favorite ones. I used to call him “the Noble Nose” that always made him laugh. Since he was an Actor I felt it would be nice to include him in the review of Acteur.


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